Description

Social anthropology studies human societies and cultures in a broad comparative perspective. Social anthropologists try to explain the causes of variation in social and cultural behaviour, and also to understand what it means to belong to a cultural group whose values and rules may be very different from those familiar to you. Studying anthropology will provide a framework to help you see what is universal to all human societies and what is variable. The programmes aim to build your capacity to analyse social and political relations and so to engage productively in major debates of today concerning social justice, multiculturalism and the direction of change in today's world.

Social anthropology is not a vocational degree, unless you choose to carry on with research in the subject. But it provides an excellent foundation for many careers. Thus, recent graduates have gone on to work in human rights, journalism, development, medicine and counselling, law, administration of refugees, nursing, teaching, business, theatre and film.

Features of LSE courses

Anthropology degrees across the UK share a common core of cross-cultural study. At LSE we are distinctive in our strengths in the fields of law, human rights, cognition, religious practice, kinship, gender, nationalism and everyday forms of the state.

Our concern with the global south (or 'third world') leads to a serious engagement with issues of development, globalisation, industrialisation and the effects of neoliberalism.

As well as encouraging sympathetic understanding of different cultural practices, we also make a priority the development of the critical faculties of our students. We analyse all forms of information - from texts to films - in ways that will enable you to question received versions of the world. Thus, as a student you will increase your factual understanding of the world, and of the interdependence of different parts of it.

While an anthropology degree is not a vocational training, the skills you develop in reading critically, writing coherently, reasoning effectively and public expression are widely valued by employers.

You can find more information about this programme on the programme website I want to find another Bachelor programme

Detailed Course Facts

Application deadline January 15
Tuition fee Not specified
Start date October  2015
Duration full-time 36  months
Languages Take an IELTS test
  • English
Delivery mode On Campus
Educational variant Full-time

Course Content

First year

(*half unit)

  • Introduction to Social Anthropology
  • Ethnography and Theory: Selected Texts
  • Public Law
  • Property I* andIntroduction to the Legal System*
  • LSE100 (Lent Term only)

Second year

  • Political and Legal Anthropology
  • Criminal Law
  • Law of Obligations
  • An option to the value of one unit in anthropology
  • LSE100 (Michaelmas Term only)

Third year

  • Law and Institutions of the European Union
  • Property II
  • Options not already taken to the value of one unit in law
  • Options not already taken to the value of one unit in anthropology

First year

You will take four units in the first year; two in anthropology and two in law, to give you a balanced grounding in both subjects.

Second year

In the second year you must take the core courses of Political and Legal Anthropology, Criminal Law and Law of Obligations. For the remaining unit you can choose anthropology courses from a list of approved options. These include the core courses from the BA/BSc in Social Anthropology (Kinship, Sex and Gender; Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations; Anthropology of Religion; Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology) as well as ethnographic and thematic option courses, the availability of which varies from year to year.

Third year

In the third year you must take Law and Institutions of the European Union and Property II. For the remaining two units you may again choose from the list of approved options, one unit each from law and anthropology.

English Language Requirements

To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

take an IELTS test.
More About IELTS

Requirements

Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A BInternational Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level
Other qualifications are considered.

English language requirements

Although it is not necessary to have the required grade in an acceptable English Language qualification when you make your application to LSE, if you are made an offer of a place and English is not your mother tongue, it is likely that you would be asked to obtain an acceptable English Language qualification as a condition of your offer.

The following qualifications are acceptable to LSE:

  • GCSE English Language with a grade B or better.
  • International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) English as a First Language with a grade B or better including the Speaking and Listening coursework component (Edexcel) or grade 2 in the optional speaking test (CIE).
  • International English Language Testing Service (IELTS) academic test with a score of 7.0 in all four components.
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 627 in the paper test including 5.5 in writing and 50 in TSE, or 107 in the internet based test with a minimum of 25 out of 30 in each of the four skills.
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with grade B or better.
  • Cambridge Advanced Certificate of English (CACE) with a grade A.
  • Cambridge English Language (1119) conducted overseas by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate: B4 or better.
  • O level (1120 Brunei, 1125 Mauritius A, 1127 Singapore) grade B or better.
  • Singapore Integrated Programme (IP) Secondary 4 English Language grade B or better.
  • Pearson Test of English (General) with a distinction at level 5 in both the written and the oral test.

Exceptions

If students offer the IGCSE in English as a First Language or O level (other than those specified above) and have been educated in the medium of English during their five most recent years of study (prior to 1 September 2011), then we will accept the qualification as sufficient evidence of English Language proficiency.

Please note that test scores must be achieved from one sitting of the relevant qualification. We will not accept individual component scores from multiple tests

Work Experience

No work experience is required.

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